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UK's Boris Johnson on the brink as ministers quit

By Michael Holden and Elizabeth Piper LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will face questions in parliament followed

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Vice President Kamala Harris will soon visit Highland Park

Vice President Kamala Harris will soon visit Highland Park, the Illinois city where at least seven people were killed in a mass shooting at a July Fourth parade, according to the press pool traveling with her Tuesday.

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Illinois Shooting Suspect Is Charged With Seven Counts of Murder

(Bloomberg) -- The suspect in the deadly mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade outside of Chicago was charged

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Oil from U.S. reserves sent overseas as gasoline prices stay high

By Arathy Somasekhar HOUSTON (Reuters) -More than 5 million barrels of oil that were part of a historic U.S. emergency

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Ecuador president appoints Pablo Arosemena as economy minister

QUITO (Reuters) -Ecuadorian President Guillermo Lasso on Tuesday appointed Pablo Arosemena, governor of Ecuador's Guayas province, as the Andean country's

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UCLA basketball, football just saved Olympics sports by moving to the Big Ten

Why was UCLA willing to leave the Pac-12 to join the Big Ten? The Bruins were in a financial hole that likely would have resulted in cutting Olympic sports.USC, UCLA and the Big Ten are being accused of killing the Pac-12. The truth of the matter is the the Bruins were on the verge of killing so...

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Gennadiy Golovkin disappointed on how Canelo handled loss to Bivol

While speaking to FanSided, Gennadiy Golovkin explained his disappointment with how Canelo Alvarez handled losing to Dmitry Bivol.In the build-up to their trilogy boxing bout, Canelo Alvarez has had plenty of negative things to say about Gennadiy Golovkin. Now, it's Golovkin's turn....

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Parade shooting suspect bought 5 weapons despite threats

The man accused of opening fire at an Independence Day parade in suburban Chicago legally bought five weapons, including two high-powered rifles

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Biden still weighing China tariff options as requests to keep them pile up

By David Lawder and Trevor Hunnicutt WASHINGTON (Reuters) -U.S. President Joe Biden's team is still looking at options on whether

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What we know about gun used by alleged Highland Park shooter Robert Crimo

The type of gun used in the Highland Park July 4th parade mass shooting that killed six and wounded was a high-powered rifle “similar to an AR-15”, police said at a briefing on Tuesday. Authorities initially said they had recovered a “rifle” from along the July 4th parade route, and that they were deliberately withholding further details as they hunted for the gunman. Sgt. Christopher Covelli, from the Lake County Major Crime Task Force, later revealed the gunman had scaled a fire escape and fired more than 70 rounds down onto the crowd from a business rooftop. Law enforcement first identified suspect Robert E Crimo, 22, through DNA found on the rifle. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives conducted a rapid trace of the rifle to identify where the gun was last sold and to whom. Mr Crimo was named as a person of interest and arrested about eight hours later after a brief pursuit with police. He has not been formally charged. Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering said in interviews on Tuesday she believed the weapon used in the mass shooting was purchased legally. Authorities later confirmed that detail and said Mr Crimo was in possession of other weapons, including a rifle at the time of his arrest. Semi-automatic gunfire rains down on a July 4th parade When the gunfire erupted just after 10am CDT, hundreds of parade-goers in Highland Park fled leaving prams, clothes and pools of blood strewn along the route in Highland Park. In videos of the incident, the heavy, staccato sound of semi-automatic gunfire was unmistakeable. “We heard 20 to 30 rounds,” Letham Burns told NBC News. “It definitely was semi-automatic, in a rapid cadence.” Another witness, Dr David Baum, told NBC Chicago the injuries sustained were “horrific”. “The kind of injuries you’d probably see in wartime, the kind of injuries that only probably happen when bullets can blow bodies up,” he said. Many took shelter anywhere they could: in dumpsters, businesses and homes as the city was locked down for hours. In recent mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York that left a combined 31 people dead, including 19 children, the 18-year-old shooters in both cases legally purchased the AR-15s they used. In Uvalde, doctors and medical examiners who responded to the scene had to identify many of the victims through DNA, so badly damaged were the bullet-riddled bodies of the first and second grade children. House lawmakers passed a sweeping gun reform package last month that included raising the minimum age to purchase a semiautomatic rifle from 18 to 21 years old and banning large-capacity magazines. However, the Senate agreed to vote on a watered-down bill that stopped shorted of raising the minimum age AR-15s could be purchased at. Instead, the Senate bill that has since been signed into law enhanced background checks for under 21 year olds, closed the so-called “boyfriend loophole,” created stiffer penalties for gun trafficking and provided $750m for mental health services and school security. AR-15s have become synonymous with mass shootings in the United States. The semi-automatic weapon was used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012, the attack on the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, in 2016, in the 2017 shooting in Las Vegas, and at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in 2018. In a press conference annoucing seven first degree murder charges against Mr Crimo, Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart called for a state and national assault weapons ban. “We should also ban assault weapons in Illinois and beyond,” Mr Rinehart said. “The assault weapon ban was implemented in 1994 with bipartisan support and with the support of law enforcement. It lasted for ten years, and studies have shown that mass shootings like what happened yesterday went down during those ten years. We should have that same ban in Illinois and beyond.” Mr Crimo is facing a life sentence in jail if convicted. Read More Robert Crimo: Everything we know about person of interest in Highland Park parade shooting Highland Park mayor reveals she was Robert Crimo’s Cub Scout leader: ‘How did somebody become this angry?’ Highland Park shooting - live: Robert Crimo described as ‘quiet and lonely’ as mayor says gun obtained legally

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Russians moving into Ukraine's Donetsk, says regional governor

(Reuters) - Russian troops are engaged in heavy fighting and making their way into Ukraine's Donetsk region after taking control

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Georgia family says road rage shooting was racially motivated

The family of a man shot multiple times at an intersection in Acworth, Georgia believe that the shooting was racially motivated. Jason Daxon, a 25-year-old Grammy nominated songwriter and Georgia resident was driving in his car on June 30 when, according to Cherokee County sheriff’s deputies, a man named Wade McEwan pulled up next to Mr Daxon’s car and fired at least 14 shots through his driver’s side window. Mr Daxon was hit twice, in the arm and the back, and has spent much of the last week in surgery. According to local television station WSB-TV 2, doctors believe that it will take Mr Daxon months to fully recover. Local law enforcement and media initially framed the shooting as an incident of road rage. But alleged footage of the incident, shared on social media, has cast doubt on that framing. Angeline Peterson, Mr Daxon’s fiancé, told WSB-TV 2 that the shooter’s behaviour does not back up the theory that they were simply acting in the heat of a road rage-inducing confrontation. “The man just shot through his own window into Jason’s car,” Ms Peterson said. “He tried to kill him... It’s not like he was doing anything to antagonize this man, he was just simply trying to pass him on the road, and the man would not let him in.” Mr McEwan has been charged with aggravated assault, reckless conduct and reckless driving, but not with more serious crimes like attempted murder. Georgia was rocked by a racially motivated murder in February of 2020 when Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man like Mr Daxon, was killed by three white men while jogging near the town of Brunswick in the southeastern part of the state. Mr Daxon, who had just signed with a record label in Atlanta and was preparing for promotional photo shoots and media appearances in the following days, has a young daughter with Ms Peterson. The family has set up a GoFundMe page to help offset Mr Daxon’s medical costs.

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The parents of a 2-year-old boy are among the victims of the July Fourth parade shooting

What was supposed to be a day of national celebration turned into a day of tragedy and fear when a gunman killed seven people and injured dozens of others at a July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois.

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FDA decision on Eisai, Biogen Alzheimer's drug due in January

By Deena Beasley (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will expedite its review of Eisai Co Ltd's and

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Blinken to seek G20 pressure on Russia to open sea lanes, warn China on Ukraine

By David Brunnstrom and Humeyra Pamuk WASHINGTON (Reuters) -U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken will call on G20 nations this

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Wimbledon quarterfinalist Kyrgios due in court in Australia

Wimbledon quarterfinalist Nick Kyrgios is due in court back home in Australia next month

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Eisai Says Alzheimer’s Drug Will Get Priority Review in US

(Bloomberg) -- Eisai Co. said its experimental Alzheimer’s drug lecanemab will receive a priority review by the U.S. Food and

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Oil Steadies Above $100 After Plunging on Recession Concerns

(Bloomberg) -- Oil steadied above $100 a barrel in early Asian trading after plunging more than 8% to the lowest

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Fierce shelling in eastern Ukraine as NATO heralds its 'historic' expansion

Fighting raged on Tuesday in and around Ukraine's eastern Donbas region as Russian troops tried to maintain a series of battlefield gains, while NATO pressed ahead with...

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Uvalde mayor says he fears a cover-up of investigation into school massacre and calls on Texas Gov. Abbott to intervene

Uvalde Mayor Don McLaughlin told CNN he's lost faith in Texas leaders investigating how law enforcement responded to the shooting that killed 19 children and two adults at Robb Elementary.

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William Thio and the multi-hyphen life

Before the slashie–a person who actively takes several careers– became a phenomenon, William Thio was navigating his way from construction projects, newscasting, modeling in commercials, joining his dogs in exhibitions and judging Pomeranians in international contests. “You have to make the most out of the short time given to you and of what life has to offer,” he says. He credits his grandmother’s half-sister and humanitarian Rosa Rosal, for motivating him. “You don’t have to be a politician to serve for as long as your heart is in the right place,” he quotes her as saying. The son of a Thai-Indonesian banker and a Filipina mother, Thio studied in Jakarta International School and Brent School. When his parents separated, Thio was under the care of his maternal grandmother, Florence Yu. At 15, Thio was discovered by a talent manager in a grocery. The latter got him jobs as a commercial model. The gigs taught him to be punctual and disciplined and helped him overcome his shyness. Youthful at 48 today, he endorses an appliance brand, a construction company and a telco. Thio went to Northern California to study media and psychology at Menlo College. His studies were interrupted when he had return to the Philippines in 1999 to attend to family matters. Forced to become a breadwinner, Thio prioritized work over getting a diploma. He started as host in a reality show, “Ideal Minds,” in a government network while being an apprentice at his grandmother’s real estate business of buying old homes, renovating and selling them. Inspired by Yu’s boldness, he established his own business, Regal Homes Inc., the construction arm of his grandmother’s property development firm, R&F Construction. He hired his grandmother’s workers with the aim of upgrading their skills set. Thio began his broadcasting career as a field reporter for RPN-9 in 2008 and was promoted to hourly updater. At the Globel News Network, he became a news anchor in 2010. He favors smaller networks, so he could focus on construction, which is detail-oriented and time-consuming as he is hands-on from the selection of materials to customer relations. “I give 100 percent,” he says. Rosa Rosal would ask him to host in her public service program and talk show “Damayan” from 2007 to 2010. When it was revived as “Damayan Ngayon” from 2017 to 2019, Thio co-hosted the show with Emilie Katigbak. Thio’s objectivity, interpersonal skills, accuracy and hard work as news anchor have earned him awards such as the Legacy Icon 2022, World Class Philippine Council Awards 2019 and the Star Awards 2019 for Best Documentary Series in “Spotlight,” wherein he interviewed the late Environment Secretary and civic leader Gina Lopez. He don’t consider the awards as hi-jinks but more of an affirmation that he is on the right track. Thio attributes his success to his family and his colleagues who have helped him in his endeavors. As the company president of Regal Homes, Thio considers himself more of an employee in the firm. “When you think you’re the owner, the ego can kick in. You have a better relationship with everyone when you are one of them. I make the rules but I have to follow them,” he says. “I want to continue my grandmother’s legacy of integrity and the familial culture.” His day runs from 7 a.m till 1 a.m. Upon arising, he deploys his people to job sites. “My specialty is restoration. We modernize old home with good foundations,” says Thio. One of his oldest projects was a mid-century house in San Lorenzo, Makati, wherein much of the original framework was retained. “The owners wanted to modernize the house without losing its soul,” he says. Celebrity dermatologist Aivee Aguilar-Teo is one of his best clients. He is the contractor of the Aivee Plus, the ultra-luxury aesthetic clinic of her chain which will open at the new Ayala Triangle Mall. He also renovated The Aivee Clinics in Alabang and SM Megamall. Before noon, he hies off to the Philippine News Agency (PNA), the government web-based wire service, where he is the newscaster for “PNA Newsroom” which is aired on PTV-4. After taping the webcast, he goes off to construction jobsites in the afternoon and reports to UNTV to be news anchor of “Why News” at 7 pm. He doesn’t find any conflicts between doing a canned webcast in a state agency and a live newscast in a private organization. Upon coming home at 11 pm, he looks after his Pomeranians. He occasionally breeds them, with the knowledge of fostering the desired appearance for competitions. With his modest kennel of six dogs, he stays till the early morning training and nurturing them. “I’ve always liked animals since I was a kid,” he says. Thio has bred 11 champions and was qualified to become a licensed international judge for Pomeranian dog shows. “When I got my accreditation, countries such as Australia, started inviting me to judge,” he says. Thio’s multi-hyphen life isn’t about pursuing paychecks just to pay the bills, but more of finding purpose. “I didn’t have formal training in any of these fields. I came from the University of Hard Knocks. I didn’t know my talents or strengths until I started working. I just adapted to the situation. In the end, there are no limits to what a person can do as long as you have the discipline and the passion.”

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Sara Kruzan: Woman sentenced to life in prison for killing her trafficker pardoned by Gavin Newsom

California Governor Gavin Newsom has pardoned a woman who was convicted of murdering a man who abused her and had been trafficking her to other men to be raped. Sara Kruzan was only 16 when she managed to obtain a gun and shoot the man abusing her. She was convicted at her trial in 1995 and sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. In 2010, then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger commuted her sentence to 25 years to life. Three years later she was re-sentenced, changing her punishment to 13 years to life. Ms Kruzan spent 18 years in prison before being released. Mr Newsom granted the pardon on Friday along with 16 others, according to a press release from his office. “She has provided evidence that she is living an upright life and has demonstrated her fitness for restoration of civic rights and responsibilities,” the governor's clemency certificate says. “Ms. Kruzan committed a crime that took the life of the victim. Since then, Ms. Kruzan has transformed her life and dedicated herself to community service. This act of clemency for Ms. Kruzan does not minimize or· forgive her conduct or the harm it caused. It does recognize the work she has done since to transform herself." Ms Kruzan met George Gilbert, the man who trafficked her and who she later killed, when she was 11 years old. Soon after that meeting, Howard began trafficking her to men who raped her. When she was 16, Ms Kruzan was threatened by her boyfriend's uncle, which involved her in a plot to rob Howard. She went to his motel room to rob him and shot him in the ensuing chaos. She said that she was in fear for her life during the altercation. Read More Zara Aleena's aunt says her niece valued her 'independence' more than anything Millennial Money: What if you can’t ‘out-budget’ inflation? Tips for growing a healthy garden during drought

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County attorney calls for assault weapons ban in Illinois ‘and beyond’ in wake of Highland Park shootings

Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart called for a state and national assault weapons ban in the aftermath of the mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade that left seven people dead and dozens more wounded in Highland Park, Illinois. Mr Rinehart, a resident of Highland Park, appeared at a press conference on Tuesday afternoon to announce that alleged Highland Park mass shooter Robert Crimo has been charged with seven counts of first degree murder and said that further charges against Mr Crimo will be forthcoming. He also used his platform to call on elected officials to strengthen gun control measures as US grapples with yet another rash of mass shootings inflicted by alleged shooters who legally purchased their firearms. “We should also ban assault weapons in Illinois and beyond,” Mr Rinehart said. “The assault weapon ban was implemented in 1994 with bipartisan support and with the support of law enforcement. It lasted for ten years, and studies have shown that mass shootings like what happened yesterday went down during those ten years. We should have that same ban in Illinois and beyond.” The crowd gathered in front of the podium cheered as Mr Rinehart called for a renewed ban on assault weapons. Mr Rinehart also extolled Illinois’ red flag law designed to take guns out of the hands of people considered threats to themselves or their communities, but said that the state must work to increase awareness of how it functions. “Illinois has a strong red flag law that keeps communities safe and erespects everyone’s rights,” Mr Rinehart said. “We must vastly increase awareness and education about this red flag law called the Illinois Firearm Restraining Order.” Mr Crimo may serve as yet another poster child for the flaws in the US’s gun control system. The 21-year-old, who dressed in women’s clothing during the shooting, legally purchased the high-powered firearm he used and had a past that one former high school classmate told NBC News was full of “red flags.” Just two weeks ago, President Joe Biden signed the US’s first substantial gun control bill in decades following the mass shooting at a Uvalde, Texas elementary school that claimed 21 lives. That bill strengthened background checks for young gun buyers and closed the ‘Boyfriend Loophole’ to prevent domestic abusers from gaining access to weapons, among other measures, but it did not ban any guns. The bill passed the US Senate with bipartisan support — which Mr Rinehart noted once existed for an assault weapons ban as well. He argued that the reinstatement of such a ban nationally would not significantly infringe on Americans’ freedom, and certainly not in contrast with how that lack of a ban has infringed. “All of the people who died steps from here lost their freedom,” Mr Rinehart said at the press conference. “All of it. Every ounce of freedom that they had. The freedom to love. The freedom to learn. And the freedom to live a full life. Their freedom matters too. We must do more as we think and reflect upon their freedom on this July 5.” Read More Highland Park mayor reveals she was Chicago shooter's Cub Scout leader Highland Park set tight gun limits long before parade attack Synagogue member, father among the dead in parade shooting

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Roe v Wade: Mississippi judge refuses to block abortion ban

It is part of an escalation in activity in US courts as states seek to impose abortion restrictions.

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Ben & Jerry's sues parent Unilever to block sale of Israeli business

By Jonathan Stempel and Jessica DiNapoli NEW YORK (Reuters) -Ben & Jerry's on Tuesday sued its parent Unilever Plc to

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